Terahertz imaging in reflection mode: detection of metallic objects hidden under clothes

Reflection Terahertz imaging of metallic objects hidden under clothes. Prototype of screening system.

This awesome test vividly demonstrates the capabilities of our TERA-series imaging cameras to detect metallic objects of various shapes and size hidden under outerwear. We can see how image of a metallic object resembling a handgun appears on the screen when the object is placed inside of different overcoats’ used in the video.

The test employs TERA-4096 sub-THz imaging camera and Terahertz source /IMPATT diode radiating at 100 GHz; respective Terahertz optics and a lap-top with USB port, as detailed below.

TERA-4096 sub-Terahertz Imaging Sensor Array
Spectral Range: 40 GHz — 0.7 THz
Frequency set for the test 100 GHz
Pixel Size / Pitch: 3 x 3 mm
Number of Pixels: 4096
Responsivity: 50kV/W
Noise Equivalent Power: 1 nW/Hz0.5
Size of device 20 x 20 x 10 cm
Terasense Viewer ® Software

It is worth mentioning that the videos feature our old model of Tera-4096 with pixel size 3×3 mm. We have already developed and commercialized our NEW model, which is more compact and has pixel size 1.5 x 1.5 mm.

The distance from our imaging sensor array to the target -metallic object- set for this reflection mode imaging test is aprx. 1 m. All in all, far our experience of remote imaging has been mainly focused on the distances of 1 to 3 meters away from the target, which appears optimal for our THz imaging tasks.

If considered comprehensively for security screening application, also referred to as full body scanning, such TERA-4096 system would require 4 IMPATT diodes preset to equivalent frequency and outfitted with 50mW power output. This system will be optimal to support imaging task in question, while the recommended distance would be 1m away from the target.

Note: Frequency range 94 — 105 GHz appears to be the most optimal for remote THz imaging purposes.

One comment

  1. +Terasense
    How high of a quality image can this stuff produce?

    Is there enough terahertz occuring naturally to produce an image, or do you need an active emitter?

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